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Posts tagged "child custody"

International abductions and Georgia child custody

Georgia parents who have gone through a divorce are often not aware of the complex ramifications of international, federal and state laws when a noncustodial parent takes the child or children out of the United States in violation of a court orrder. While courts generally take action to promote the return of the children to their nation of origin and enforce the original child custody decree, a Georgia court's power may be restrained by a number of difficulties.

Shared parenting better for kids, researchers say

Georgia parents who are contemplating a divorce may be interested to learn about a study that was recently conducted in Sweden. In the study, researchers looked at stress levels in children who were in shared parenting custodial arrangements versus those who primarily resided with one divorced parent while having infrequent visits with the other.

Factors involved in grandparent custody

Some grandparents in Georgia might be interested in obtaining custody of their grandchildren. This depends on the specific situation and, in some cases, the grandchild's preference. However, if the child's parents challenge the request, the courts may consider their right to custody as superior to that of the grandparents.

Georgia custody disputes may be resolvable without court

In Georgia and other states, parents and guardians who become involved in custody disputes may be able to avoid going to court. While formal judicial resolution can provide useful resources for families during their battles, court cases are only one way to settle such arguments. Parents can also devise unique parenting agreements that set the terms of future interactions with their ex-spouses and children. These documents are commonly filed along with divorce paperwork, and they become legally binding after gaining official approval from a judge.

Divorce evidence can be found on social media web sites

Georgia spouses who are contemplating a divorce may want to watch their personal posts on social media sites. That's because their spouse could use these postings as evidence against them to bolster their chances of a more favorable divorce settlement.

Divorce can affect a parent's taxes

Georgia parents who may be going through a divorce may be more worried about which parent will be awarded child custody than their taxes. However, decisions made regarding how the child's time may be split up can actually affect a parent's taxes once the divorce process is complete. As such, tax incidence should be taken into account during the divorce process.

Can children decide which parent they want to live with?

When divorced or separated parents in Georgia cannot come to an agreement about child custody issues, a judge will have to make those decisions. While considering the different options, a judge might take the wishes of the child into consideration or let the child decide where they would like to live. However, the child must have reached a certain age before they can have an influence on a custody decision.

What is the Hague Convention?

Prospective adoptive parents in Georgia may be interested to learn about the Hague Convention. Each country creates its own laws and standards in regard to the protection of children. However, the statutes of individual countries are not sufficient to protect the interests of children who are adopted internationally.

Child custody in Georgia

Parents and guardians in Georgia may benefit from learning more about how the state handles child custody issues. Noncustodial parents who are interested in obtaining custody of their children are required to file a petition for a custody change with the Superior Court that presides over the custodial parent's residing county. At the hearing, noncustodial parents are required to exhibit material proof of a significant change in circumstance that directly affects family life and the child's best interests.

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